The Local Native Plants Blog

View to the right of The Great Trail, off Malden Rd.

For the Local Native Plants video, I’m attempting to identify plants from Essex Region Conservation Authority’s (ERCA) “A Guide to Local Native Plants”. The guide covers 31 of the most common local native plants, each with blooming, height, wildlife value, identification tips and other information included, like pictures from various stages of development. The guide states, “Native plants are species that have been growing in a region since before European settlement, have evolved with our climate and are well adapted to survive throughout the year”. For Essex County, that means these plants have been thriving here for over 250 years, that’s a quarter/millennium! 

Cup plant: “large, dark green, toothed leaves … branching clusters of yellow, daisy-like flowers with darker yellow centres.” – A Guide to Local Native Plants

Because native plants “require less maintenance and watering than non-native ornamental plants … and readily re-seed themselves, coming back year after year”, they are an excellent choice to fill your garden with for year-round colour. 

Boneset: “Veiny leaves in pairs that join around the stem; white, flat topped, hairy flower clusters.” – A Guide to Local Native Plants

I did a ‘tester’ video of this in June. I was able to identify a few plants, plus, I had fun and it’s always nice to admire their pretty colours, so I made another one. I found three native plants for this video, with the two from June that’s 5 of the guide’s 31 that I have identified. I still have a few more weeks for late season plants that bloom in October, like Ironweed and Switch Grass. 

New England aster: “Alternate, clasping leaves that wrap partially around the stem; large clusters of purple flowers with narrow petals and yellow centres.” – A Guide to Local Native Plants

The exciting part about this project for me is to bring together a local interest activity and make a video about it. Whether you’re seeking to identify local plants, or (like I do) just enjoy seeing any bit of Windsor on the screen, this video is for you. I found all of these plants while walking the trails at Malden Park, and regular visitors will recognize it. I hope this video helps you recognize plants out on the trail, and that you enjoy my attempt at taking some cinematic footage of local plant-life. 

A short video identifying three local native plants.

2 Replies to “The Local Native Plants Blog”

  1. Is ‘Poison Ivy’ a local native plant?

    I always forget about what this one looks like.

    Also what plants are dangerous to the touch?

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